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TfL publishes River Crossing consultation findings

Between 29 October 2012 to 1 February 2013, Transport for London (TfL) held a public consultation on river crossings, to gather views on a range of options for improving cross-river travel in east and south east London.

Today, Tuesday 7 May, TfL has published its findings.

Read a summary of the results from TfL’s River Crossings consultation

There was over 70% support for each of the fixed link (bridge/tunnel) options, with the strongest support for the Silvertown tunnel (77%).

  • 71% of respondents supported a fixed link at Gallions Reach by 2021 and 72% support a fixed link at Gallions Reach by 2031 (if a ferry does not adequately address the area’s needs)
  • The proportions who opposed the fixed links were 15% for the Silvertown Tunnel, 15% for the Gallions Reach fixed link in 2031 and 16% for the Gallions Reach fixed link in 2021.
  • Overall 51% of respondents support a new ferry at Woolwich and 52% support a new ferry at Gallions Reach. However, there is more opposition to the Gallions Reach ferry option than the Woolwich ferry option: 22% compared to 19%.
  • 55% of respondents opposed a toll for the new crossings and also the Blackwall tunnel and a third supported it (14% strongly supported it).
  • The support for each of the fixed link crossings is greater than the opposition to the toll. But less than the support for the ferry options.

In response to the findings of Transport for London’s consultation on proposals to improve cross-river travel in east and south east London, London First Chief Executive, Baroness Jo Valentine said:

“It is striking to see the strength of support for more river crossings – 77% of respondents expressed support for a tunnel, between the Greenwich Peninsula and Silvertown and over 70% favoured a bridge, rather than a ferry, further down the river at Gallions Reach near Beckton to Woolwich.

“The Mayor and TfL must now push on with developing proposals to introduce both crossings rather than just one. Additional river crossings will not only relieve existing congestion but will also support economic growth and regeneration.”

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